Leadership Council


 

  • David Bressoud, Former President of the Mathematical Association of America.  As DeWitt Wallace Professor of Mathematics at Macalester College, Bressoud was been chair of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science from 1995 until 2001.  He has held visiting positions at the Institute for Advanced Study, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Minnesota, Université Louis Pasteur (Strasbourg, France), and the State College Area High School. Dr. Bressoud has received the MAA Distinguished Teaching Award and the MAA Beckenbach Book Award for Proofs and Confirmations.  He has published over fifty research articles in number theory, combinatorics, and special functions.  David has chaired the AP Calculus Development Committee and has served as Director of the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education program in Quantitative Methods for Public Policy.
  • Edward B. Burger, Edward Burger is the President of Southwestern University as well as an educational and business consultant. Most recently he was the Francis Christopher Oakley Third Century Professor of Mathematics at Williams College, and served as Vice Provost for Strategic Educational Initiatives at Baylor University. He is the author of over 60 research articles, books, and video series (starring in over 3,000 on-line videos). Burger was awarded the 2000 Northeastern Section of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) Award for Distinguished Teaching and 2001 MAA Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo National Award for Distinguished Teaching of Mathematics. The MAA also named him their 2001-2003 Polya Lecturer. He was awarded the 2003 Residence Life Teaching Award from the University of Colorado at Boulder. In 2004 he was awarded Mathematical Association of America's Chauvenet Prize and in 2006 he was a recipient of the Lester R. Ford Prize. In 2007, 2008, and 2011 he received awards for his video work.  In 2007 Williams College awarded him the Nelson Bushnell Prize for Scholarship and Teaching. Burger is an associate editor of the American Mathematical Monthly and Math Horizons Magazine and serves as a Trustee of the Kenan Institute for the Arts at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. In 2020 he will become the CEO and President of St. David's Foundaton in Austin.
  • Robert Jay Daverman, former Secretary of the American Mathematical Society (1999 to 2013).   After earning a B.A. from Calvin College in 1963, he entered graduate school at the University of Wisconsin where he received a Ph.D. in 1967 with R.H. Bing (member of the National Academy of Sciences, and Renowned Topologist), serving as his advisor. Shortly thereafter he moved, with his family, to Knoxville to join the faculty at the University of Tennessee.  A world renowned expert in the topology of manifolds, Daverman has authored or co-authored more than a hundred original research articles.  In the American Mathematical Society, he served as the ninth Secretary in the 114-year history of the organization.
  • Norbert Dittrich, President of the Welch Foundation located in Houston, Texas.  The Foundation is a private grant-making organization that supports basic research in chemistry in Texas.  With assets over $700 million and an annual grant budget of $35 million, the Foundation has grants at 68 Texas educational institutions.  Dittrich is a native of Schulenburg, Texas. Certified public accountant and received a BBA from the University of Texas in 1974. Prior to joining the foundation in 1977, he was in the accounting firm of Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. Dittrich has leadership roles with the Foundation Financial Officers Group, Philanthropy Southwest, America Chemical Society, Science History Institute, Texas Interscholastic League Foundation, Tax Executives, Inc., St. Agnes Academy and St. Francis de Sales School Foundation.  He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and a member of the University of Texas-Austin, College of Natural Sciences Advisory Council. (19pep52@gmail.com)
  • Jay Davis, former President of The Hertz Foundation; National Security Fellow; former Director, Defense Threat Reduction Agency; Founding Director of the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. For his contributions to national security as founding Director of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Jay was twice awarded the Distinguished Public Service Medal, DOD’s highest civilian award. Jay participated in two UN inspections of Iraq in 1991, and briefed the UN Security Council on his findings.  He has served on the University of Chicago Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratory, the Panel on Public Affairs of the American Physical Society, and on multiple review committees for programs at the los Alamos, Sandia and Livermore Laboratories.  He currently chairs the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board of the National Academy of Sciences. Jay received his BA in Physics from the University of Texas (1963), MA in Physics from the University of Texas (1964), and PhD in Physics from the University of Wisconsin (1969). He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society.
  • Roger Howe, Professor of Mathematics at Yale University.  Roger has been teaching and doing research in the mathematics department at Yale for over 40 years and has held visiting positions at many universities and research institutes in the U.S., Europe and Asia.  He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.  He has served as a member and Chair of the Committee on Education of the American Mathematical Society.  He is currently a member of the U.S. National Commission on Mathematics Instruction, and of the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematics Instruction.  In 2006, he received the Award for Distinguished Public Services from the American Mathematical Society.
  • Robion Kirby, Professor of Mathematics at the University of California-Berkeley.  Rob also serves as the President of Mathematical Science Publishers, a non-profit publishing house that focuses on mathematics and engineering journals.  He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and was awarded the Oswald Veblen Prize in Geometry in 1971 by the AMS.  In 1995, he became the first mathematician to receive the NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing.  He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2001 and became a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society in 2012.
  • Bernard L. Madison, Professor of Mathematics and former Dean of the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Arkansas.  Madison has chaired the Mathematical Association of America’s committees on Placement Examinations, Status of the Profession, Articulation and Placement, and assessment.  During the period 1986-89, he structured and directed the Mathematical Sciences in the Year 2000 at the National Research Council, which included the 1987 National Forum, Calculus for a new Century.  He has directed several NSF-funded national dissemination and research projects, and currently serves as the founding president of the interdisciplinary National Numeracy Network.  Prior to this role in national services, Madison’s focused largely on research in topology and algebra.  Madison has a BS in mathematics and physics from Western Kentucky University and MS and PhD degrees in mathematics from the University of Kentucky.
  • Robert "Jay" Malone, Executive Director, History of Science Society.  Dr. Malone received his Ph.D. in the History of Science from the University of Florida in 1996 and has taught at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro and Appalachian State University. In 1998 he became the History of Science Society’s first executive director and joined the faculty of the University of Florida in 2003.  In 2010 the Executive Office of the 3,000-member organization moved to its present headquarters at the University of Notre Dame. There Dr. Malone also occasionally teaches courses that examine science in America in the 18th and 19th centuries.  He gave an invited talk at the 2007 Legacy of R.L. Moore Conference entitled “Practical Suggestions on Administration in the Academic World.” 
  • Mary Ann Rankin, Senior Vice President and Provost at the University of Maryland, is a national leader in innovative and highly successful programs for boosting the supply of science and math teachers and other STEM graduates.  Rankin is a former CEO of the National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI) in Dallas.  Previously, she spent 36 years at the University of Texas at Austin, where she served for six years as chair of biological sciences and for nearly 17 years as Dean of the College of Natural Sciences (CNS).  As Dean of CNS, Rankin created, with her administrative team, numerous highly successful programs for undergraduates, including the UTeach program for math and science teacher preparation and the Freshman Research Initiative.  Working with the College of Liberal Arts, she created the Texas Interdisciplinary Program, a special opportunity curriculum for at-risk students that enrolls and enhances outcomes for over 900 students.  These efforts significantly increased student retention and graduation rates particularly among underrepresented minorities.  Rankin received her bachelor’s degree in biology and chemistry from Louisiana State University and doctorate in physiology and behavior from the University of Iowa in 1972.  She was a National Institutes of Health post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University until joining the University of Texas at Austin in 1975 as an assistant professor of zoology.  She serves on several non-profit boards including the Science Education Advisory Board of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Advisory Committee for the Division of Education and Human Resources at the National Science Foundation.